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Nigerian Christians and Muslims gathered on 19 August to open the International Centre for Inter-Faith Peace and Harmony (ICIPH). The centre is located in Kaduna, where more than 20,000 people have died in various conflicts over the last three decades. Amid a growing number of interfaith initiatives in Nigeria, the new centre has a unique […]

via Nigerian Christians and Muslims open historic peace centre — A Center of Christian-Muslim Engagement for Peace and Justice: News and Views

Awe-inspiring performances in a close match-up between Americans Simone Biles and Aly Raisman, and Russian Aliya Mustafina, are a cross-section of faith, race and nationality DE JANEIRO, Brazil — In a world awash in religious and sectarian tensions, the three Olympic victors in the women’s all-around gymnastics competition delivered a multi-faith mosaic on the medals […]

via Olympic women’s all-around champions: A Christian, a Jew and a Muslim — A Center of Christian-Muslim Engagement for Peace and Justice: News and Views

At the centre of one of the Earth’s harshest environments, on the border of Afghanistan and Tajikistan, two cookbook authors have found “a profoundly human place”.

via BBC Travel: Afghanistan’s enigmatic food secret — Ismailimail

Fethullah Gulen

Imam Fethullah Gulen

I try really hard not to be political.

 

Around my kids, I try to encourage them to think for themselves, and not to mimic someone else’s opinions.

 

And although sometimes the rhetoric can be difficult to stomach (and it’s completely coincidental this thought comes to mind as the RNC and DNC conventions are going on), I am very grateful for the democratic process at large. We are fortunate in the US to have a voice in governing ourselves – sometimes it is entirely true that the shrillest voices are heard over the most reasoned, still if we do not like the people voted into power we can always vote them out next election cycle.

 

This is also a blessing for which many, many Muslims around the world are thankful. “Having a voice in your own governance is truly a gift from Allah,” an instructor from one of my Islamic theology classes told me. “The Prophet taught that consensus is the best way to make decisions in a community, and democracy gives us that opportunity.”

 

Whether or not I agree with the person speaking, whatever he or she has to say, I am always very grateful I live in a country where they have the right to say it – and that I have the right to say my piece, too. And then we can vote on it and live with, enjoy, or endure the results of our voting until the next election!

 

I was excited as Turkey revamped their government and constitution years ago, securing their right to self-governance. I have been very concerned at the actions of their president as he veered away from the Turkish constitution (setting up his on extra-constitutional “courts” and judges, declaring illegality through fiat rather than the rule of law, and more).

 

And with his reactions to the badly reasoned, poorly planned, and failed coup recently, the president of Turkey has placed himself soundly with some very bad company. He has trampled the constitution of Turkey, and is holding the US ransom in the fight against ISIS for all the world, in his efforts to punish one man. A man the Turkish president blames for the failed coup, but a man who has spent every moment of his adult life in inviting people to support the rule of law, exercise their democratic rights, and in all situations to act peaceably, lawfully, and respect for authority.

 

He is a man the US House Committee on Foreign Relations considers possibly the most important moderate Islamic voice in the international fight against ISIS and the terror that group incites.

 

His name is Fethullah Gulen. A man of peace and learning.

 

And this is his reaction to the Turkish president’s accusations – “Government should be won through a process of free and fair elections, not force. I pray to God for Turkey, for Turkish citizens, and for all those currently in Turkey that this situation is resolved peacefully and quickly.”

 

Not the sentiments of a coup mastermind, but a God-loving man of peace.

 

Read the rest of Fethullah Gulen’s comments here.

 

In this country, he deserves a voice too.

 

 

FOCUS has delivered vital food supplies provided by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to 327 households, or 1,547 individuals in the Wakhan Corridor of Afghanistan

via Focus Humanitarian Assistance delivers emergency food assistance to isolated communities in the Wakhan Corridor of Afghanistan — Ismailimail

FOCUS has delivered vital food supplies provided by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to 327 households, or 1,547 individuals in the Wakhan Corridor of Afghanistan

via Focus Humanitarian Assistance delivers emergency food assistance to isolated communities in the Wakhan Corridor of Afghanistan — Ismailimail

The Eco-Soap Bank aims to raise $30,000 in contributions to continue to provide necessary hygiene and sanitation to rural Cambodian communities for this year.

via Samir Lakhani, Founder Eco-Soap Bank, Cambodia — Ismailimail

The Interfaith Community of Chattanooga hosted a 50-minute service at the UTC Student Center this afternoon, highlighted by a speech from Mark Siljander. Siljander, a former U.S. representative and United Nations ambassador, shared his story of coming to learn about the Muslim faith. He said he began his political career as an outspoken proponent of […]

via Christians, Muslims bridge gaps on faith one year after violent rampage — A Center of Christian-Muslim Engagement for Peace and Justice: News and Views

In January friends of mine invited me to attend a silent protest at a Republican political rally. I’m not very politically active; my interests lie more in interfaith activities and building bridges between people who are different. My friend enticed me to go because her main purpose was to take part in a silent protest […]

via Do All Republicans Hate Muslims? I Don’t Think So, Here’s Why… — A Center of Christian-Muslim Engagement for Peace and Justice: News and Views

DALLAS — The minister and the imam had known each other barely a year. They had met at a vigil after the mass shooting at a Charleston, S.C., church in June 2015. They had encountered each other at rallies to protest gun violence and domestic violence, to memorialize a long-ago lynching, to counter a Ku […]

via ‘If we were not brothers before this, we certainly are brothers now,’ a Dallas imam tells a minister — A Center of Christian-Muslim Engagement for Peace and Justice: News and Views

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