Tag Archive: Visual arts


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For the last several months, I’ve been designing and cutting out the pieces for the next 25 sculptures.  The Names in this sequence (here or here) relate to each other in interesting ways, and remind me of expanding stars or fertile pollen.  The photos are of the patterns used to cut the glass, and I’ll be adding more photos and discuss what I was thinking in the designs in the next week or two, then start adding photos of the completed sculptures.

One of my favorite shapes to work with is the greater stellated dodecahedron – partly because the name is cool, partly because it makes a beautiful star shape.  But mostly because there’s a lot of symbolism to the numbers and shapes involved in its construction.

Great Stellated Dodecahedron Image from Wikimedia Commons

Great Stellated Dodecahedron
Image from Wikimedia Commons

For more on stellations and dimensional geometry construction, check out Paper Models of Polyhedra.

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Photos courtesy of Emily Ellis, Dr. C. Lance Harding, Ph.D., and Wikimedia Commons

My friend Lance, Dr. C. Lance Harding, Ph.D., came to the 99 Names workshop as my “ringer”–he knows so much about the uses of geometry in sacred art and architecture, I knew that he could answer any questions which threw me.  Luckily, he never had to pull out his blue mavin card and was able to enjoy the workshop.  With his insight and experience with sacred art from around the world, it was a pleasure walking with him through the exhibit Beauty and Belief:  Crossing Bridges with the Arts of Islamic Culture, and he was kind enough to share his feelings about the exhibit.

1.  What is the basis of your interest in Islamic Art?

While studying at The Visual Islamic and Traditional Arts Department in London (now called the Prince’s School of Traditional Arts), I gained an appreciation and interest in the concepts behind Islamic Art.  At our school we studied the foundations of Traditional and Sacred Art from various cultures.  I was interested in learning some of the basic principles for combining religious belief with works of art.  The simple basic concepts found in Islamic works of art gave examples of how this could be done.  First, the making of Arabic Calligraphy from sacred writings into a visual art form in texts and in their mosques was an important way for teaching the “Word of God” to the Islamic people.  Christians did much the same thing in their hand written texts and also by making biblical stories the basis of their stained glass windows inside the cathedrals.  The Islamic use of geometric pattern, that represented the order and power of God or the “Fear or Awe” of God opened up a whole new world for me in terms of representing God’s Creation.  The beautiful Arabesque (or plant form) designs that are a major part of Islamic Art add a further dimension representing the “Love of God” and the Paradise of God–God’s grace and love for mankind.

2.  As you walk through the Beauty and Belief exhibit at the BYU Museum of Art, what is your overall impression?

My overall impression of the Beauty and Belief exhibit is that the people who created these wonderful works of art were master-craftsmen.  They did not separate their art from their craft.  Their objects of adornment and their daily useful objects often became one and the same.  These works of art must have been used to combine what they considered to be sacred with the objects of their daily life.

3.  How does your background, both as an artist and as a person of faith, inform your reactions to the exhibit?

I believe that my background as a Christian, and as a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, has prepared me to accept the sacred art and teachings of other faiths and cultures.  My studies of art in other cultures in connection with my studies of Islamic Art has brought me to the understanding that all of God’s children have had access to divine inspiration and knowledge which was handed down to them either through their ancestors from God or given to them directly by God.  So, when I study and examine closely Islamic works of art, I see God in them just as much as when I examine Christian art or when I try to interpret Biblical Jewish art and architecture.

4.  Which piece or pieces are you drawn to most strongly, and why?

I am naturally drawn to those pieces in the Islamic exhibit that are derived directly from geometry and geometric form.  In London I studied ancient and sacred geometry and that was the foundation of ancient architecture and works of art.  I have always been interested in the basic order of the universe found in God’s creations as expressed in these types of art and architecture.  I see geometry and symmetry as the basis of all creation.  It is contained in all natural forms as well as being the basis of number, mathematics, science, and art.

5.  This exhibit is comprised of works made by artists who testify of their faith with every piece.  As a Christian how do you respond to this?

The concept of making art as part of your lifestyle has always intrigued me.  In the Islamic world they seem to have the ability to find the sacred in every day objects by turning them into sacred works of art.  This is what “Sacred” means–to make holy or to set apart and improve that which is routine in our lives in order to bring God into the scheme of things.  Faith is something that is meant to be put into practice every day in our lives.  Beautiful works of art represent and increase that faith.  As a Christian I see the basic Christian virtues of knowledge, temperance, patience, Godliness, brotherly kindness, and charity, along with consistency and endurance, incorporated into Islamic works of art.  (II Peter Ch. 1)

6.  How has this exhibit, and your work with Islamic art in general, informed your faith as a Christian?

The works of art in the BYU exhibit as well as the many other Islamic works I have seen and studied have given me the knowledge that there are certain universal principles that God has extended to all peoples and cultures, particularly those of the three Abrahamic traditionsJewish, Christian, and Muslim.  I have always been interested in the three Abrahamic religions.  Jewish and Christian teachings about God, related to the “Light”, the “Life”, and the “Love” of God, appear to match the three basic elements of Islamic art which are the “Word of God” (or the Light), the “Fear or Awe” of God (or the Life), and the beautiful Arabesque plant form designs (which are the Love of God).  I believe that the time will come as God’s influence returns to this earth, that Jehovah–Christ–Allah, different Names, but the true God of this World–He will unite all the children of Abraham and they will live side by side together in peace.

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For the July Summer Spectacular Artwalk in the Arts district in Scottsdale, Arizona, Jason Lanegan (BYU Visual Arts Department Galleries Director) and I were invited to bring artwork to the Marshall/LeKae Gallery.  We brought work by selected visual arts faculty (including Sunny Belliston Taylor and Fidalis Buehler), students in the visual arts program (including Teresa Ewell and Steven Waggoner), and several sculptures from the 99 Names project.  It was well attended, with lots of valuable input from attendees; Peter Strub, Gallery Principal and curator of the exhibit, gave us a wealth of insight and guidance for future student shows.  Everyone at the gallery was wonderful to work with, and it was a tremendous experience to be surrounded by the work of so many incredible artists.  Linda Sherer of the Gallery provided images of the Summer Spectacular opening night–thank you!

In 2009, Dr. Kathryn Van Wagoner, math professor at Utah Valley University, assembled an art exhibit with her students highlighting the marriage of art and mathematics.  UVU has posted her digital archive of the exhibit, and viewers can see images of the works as well as the artists’ statements.  All the artists involved created fascinating work, and thanks to Dr. Van Wagoner the glass sculptures I made, Altar of Apollo and Hermegnostic Box, made the cut.  Among the many beautiful pieces there were paintings, drawings, computer prints, and some examples of truly extraordinary woodwork.

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